An explanation of our 10-year warranty

by Mike Smith December 29, 2016 2 Comments

No. 22 Warranty Card

We are occasionally asked why we offer a ten year warranty, in contrast to the so-called "lifetime" warranties that are advertised by other titanium builders.

We are tremendously proud of the craftsmanship of our frames, and we have built our brand around offering what we believe are the best made titanium frames currently available. We strive to be open and honest with every element that goes into our bikes, and our warranty is no exception.

We launched our comprehensive ten year warranty in response to the so-called "lifetime" warranties of several other titanium builders. What we strongly disliked about those warranties was that despite the "lifetime" name, what is actually covered and for how long can be very misleading. Some real-world examples:

  • Brand A offers a lifetime warranty, but that coverage is actually limited to the "useful life cycle" of the bicycle, noting that: "This warranty is not meant to suggest or imply that the frame cannot be broken or will last forever. Bicycles and/or frames will not last forever. The length of the useful life cycle will vary depending on the type of frame, riding conditions and care the bicycle receives." This warranty also specifically excludes failure from fatigue from its coverage.
  • Brand B offers a "lifetime warranty against manufacturing defects", but also specifically excludes fatigue from its coverage.
  • Brand C offers a lifetime warranty which covers the "normal life expectancy" of the frame, with no indication of what that life actually is.

The list of other titanium builders taking a similar approach is very long. What we don't like about this type of warranty is that it sets the expectation that a titanium bike will last forever. What these warranties are actually saying is that if you find a defect in the quality of manufacturing they may cover you, but if your bike fails outside the arbitrarily set "lifetime" of a frame then warranty coverage is no longer available.

We wanted to be careful not to set a misleading expectation, so we opted to take what we thought was a more inclusive, better defined warranty approach. We cover our bikes for ten years, because we feel that a decade of use is more than enough time for any construction defects to be found. We also do not exclude fatigue from our warranty—if it fails, even from fatigue, within the warranty period then we will honour the warranty.

Our full warranty is available here: http://22bicycles.com/pages/warranty.




Mike Smith
Mike Smith

Author



2 Responses

Warren Pear
Warren Pear

June 25, 2017

Mike
I saw one of your bikes for the first time today at a rest stop during a ride. They are stunning. This is what led me to your website and this post. Regarding lifetime warranties, I recently cracked a late 1980’s Spectrum. When I called Tom Kellogg for the price of repairing the frame, he told me that it was still under warranty. Thus, although I can’t comment on Brands A-C cited above, Brand Tom Kellogg certainly lives up to his “lifetime” warranty.

Andy long
Andy long

December 29, 2016

Mike, so refreshing to hear the honesty in your words. I make and sell custom products and customers ask me about the “warranty” all the time. My typical response is that warranties are good for sales and sales only in typical consumer goods. Many of my materials are warrantied but not the labor that goes into them which is always the lion share of the cost. I always reassure to my customers that if something happens that I deem my fault I will be happy to take of it for them.Why wouldn’t I? Even if I did put a fixed warranty on my workmanship I would expect it to last longer than that period anyway, like any good “warranty”.Good on you for making a true “warranty” statement! Andy

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